Pacific PNT Tutorials

Pre-conference tutorials have been organized to provide in-depth learning prior to the start of the technical program. All courses will be taught in a classroom setting. Electronic notes will be made available for download by registered tutorial attendees; registered attendees are encouraged to download notes in advance of courses. Paper notes will not be provided. Power will not be made available to course attendees for individual laptop computers; please come prepared with adequate battery power if required.

Cost and Registration:
$400 per course (registered and paid on or before March 27)
$450 per course (registered and paid after March 27)

Registration for Pacific PNT tutorials is accomplished online through the normal conference registration process. Please reference the registration form for registration policies. ION reserves the right to cancel a course based on availability of the instructor.

Monday, May 1: 9:00 a.m. - 12:30 p.m.
Fundamentals of Inertial Navigation
Chuck Bye, Honeywell, Inc., USA
Introduction to GNSS
Dr. John W. Betz, The MITRE Corporation, USA
Monday, May 1: 1:30 p.m. - 5:00 p.m.
Sensor Integration for Navigation in GNSS-Challenging Environments
Dr. Dorota Grejner-Brzezinska and Dr. Charles Toth, The Ohio State University, USA
Unmanned Aerial System (UAS) Guidance, Navigation, & Control (GNC)
Dr. Mikel M. Miller, USA and Dr. Maarten Uijt de Haag, Ohio University, USA

Fundamentals of Inertial Navigation

Chuck Bye, Honeywell, Inc., USA
Chuck Bye, Honeywell, Inc., USA

Time: Monday, May 1, 9:00 a.m. - 12:30 p.m.
Course Level: Beginner to Intermediate

This course provides an overview of the topics required to understand and implement a strapdown navigation system. The course is divided into two sections: sensor modeling and strapdown navigation. The course focuses on the implementation, not on the derivation of the equations. Matlab/Simulink models may be provided to assist the understanding the concepts described in this course.

Sensor Modeling provides a brief description of gyro and accelerometer modeling. This course will not cover specific sensor technologies, but rather how to model any gyro or accelerometer from a system perspective. Modeling of deterministic errors such as bias, scale factor, and non-linearity; and stochastic errors will be discussed. The stochastic errors discussion will include a description of how to interpret Allan Deviation plots and modeling of the sensor errors using random Walk, Gauss Markov processes. Several examples will be presented, including guidelines for interpreting manufacturer’s product brochures as they pertain to modeling inertial sensors.

Strapdown Navigation describes the implementation of a wander azimuth frame strapdown navigation implementation. This includes a description of the reference frames used in a typical strapdown navigation system, earth model and corrections for earth induced rates and acceleration. Transformation matrices and the integration of these matrices is discussed. Other topics include Schuler oscillation, vertical channel stabilization, inertial sampling, and initialization of the navigation system.

Mr. Charles Bye is currently a Senior Fellow in the Sensor, Guidance, and Navigation COE at Honeywell. He has a broad range of technical expertise in the field of navigation that includes system engineering, software development, microelectronics, Kalman filtering, GPS, inertial sensors, and system testing. He has a MSEE from the University of Colorado, Boulder.




Introduction to GNSS

Dr. John W. Betz, The MITRE Corporation, USA
Dr. John W. Betz, The MITRE Corporation, USA

Time: Monday, May 1, 9:00 a.m. - 12:30 p.m.
Course Level: Beginner to Intermediate

This tutorial provides an introduction to satellite-based navigation and timing (satnav). It describes satnav systems, their principles of operation, and key performance metrics. It also describes and compares the various satnav systems, current and under development, that comprise the Global Navigation Satellite Service (GNSS).

The course is designed for attendees having basic understanding of engineering principles. Those with little or no previous satnav experience, along with those familiar with current GPS but seeking to learn about modernized and new systems, will all benefit from the course.

It begins with a brief history of satnav, followed by an introduction to the underlying principles that are employed. Subsequent sections describe key functions and characteristics of the space segment, ground segment, signals, and user equipment. Fundamental tools used to design systems and characterize their performance are then introduced and illustrated. Summary descriptions of current and planned satnav systems (GPS, GLONASS, Galileo, BeiDou, QZSS, NAVIC (IRNSS), and SBAS) are provided. Concepts of different augmentation systems are introduced.

Attendees will develop understanding of satnav techniques and technologies, familiarity with key concepts and terminology, and insights into the similarities and differences among the world’s satnav systems. With the foundation provided in this course, they will be able to develop deeper skills and insights from attending conference sessions, reading the literature, and experimenting with the tools and techniques introduced in this course.

Dr. John W. Betz is a Fellow of The MITRE Corporation. He has contributed to the design of modernized satnav signals, and has also influenced many aspects of satnav engineering, including systems engineering and receiver processing. He has worked on behalf of the United States with developers of the world’s satnav systems, focusing on compatibility and interoperability among all satnav systems. Among numerous awards, he is a Fellow of the ION and the IEEE. He has published numerous technical papers and book chapters, along with a textbook on satnav, and has taught short courses for many years.




Sensor Integration for Navigation in GNSS-Challenging Environments

Dr. Dorota Grejner-Brzezinska
Dr. Dorota Grejner-Brzezinska

Dr. Charles Toth, The Ohio State University, USA
Dr. Charles Toth, The Ohio State University, USA

Time: Monday, May 1, 1:30 p.m. - 5:00 p.m.
Course Level: Beginner to Intermediate

This course will provide a review of the state-of-the-art navigation sensors and techniques suitable for various close range navigation, including personal navigation and UAS. Personal navigation (PN) is defined as navigation for military and emergency personnel, while pedestrian navigation refers to location/navigation/tracking of all other types of mobile users.

The core technologies in the navigation systems are the Global Positioning System (GPS) or the Global Navigation Satellite System (GNSS) and inertial sensors, which provide seamless highly accurate navigation in open-sky environment, where GPS/GNSS signals are available. To facilitate navigation indoors or in any GPS-challenged environments, additional navigation and imaging sensors are required. An overview is provided of some of these technologies, such as, wireless local area network, IR and RF transponders, and ultra-wideband (UWB) networks, as well as a basic introduction to 2D and 3D active and passive imaging sensors.

Following the technology overview, example designs that include implementation and performance assessment of a selected navigation system prototypes in various sensor configurations, will be presented. The described systems use GPS, inertial measurement unit (IMU), UWB, digital barometer, magnetometer compass, and human locomotion model as well as 2D/3D imaging sensors to provide position and attitude estimates.

On the algorithmic side, the focus is on the indoor operation and performance of the navigation filter. Sample dead reckoning (DR) navigation approaches will be presented that employ feature tracking, human locomotion model, etc., using client-server system architecture, simultaneous mapping and localization, adaptive knowledge-based system (KBS), etc. System design, as well as a summary of the performance analysis in the mixed indoor-outdoor environments, with the special emphasis on DR performance, will be discussed.

Dr. Dorota Grejner-Brzezinska is a Lowber B. Strange endowed professor and chair, Department of Civil, Environmental and Geodetic Engineering, and director of the Satellite Positioning and Inertial Navigation (SPIN) Laboratory at The Ohio State University. Her research interests cover GPS/GNSS algorithms, GPS/IMU and other sensor integration for navigation in GPS-challenged environments, sensors and algorithms for indoor and personal navigation, Kalman filter and non-linear filtering. She published over 300 journal and proceedings papers. She recently served (2011-15) as president of the International Association of Geodesy (IAG) Commission 4, Positioning and Applications, and is IAG Fellow; she has been serving on the Institute of Navigation (ION) Council for the past nine years, and is currently ION president. Is a Fellow and both the ION and the Royal Institute of Navigation (RIN).

Dr. Charles Toth is a research professor in the Department of Civil, Environmental and Geodetic Engineering the SPIN Laboratory at The Ohio State University. His research expertise covers broad areas of 2D/3D signal processing, spatial information systems, photogrammetry, high-resolution imaging, surface extraction, modeling, integrating and calibrating of multi-sensor systems, multi-sensor geospatial data acquisition systems, personal navigation, and mobile mapping technology. He is the president of American Society of Photogrammetry and Remote Sensing, and second vice president of the International Society of Photogrammetry and Remote Sensing. He has published over 300 papers in various journals and proceedings.




Unmanned Aerial System (UAS) Guidance, Navigation, & Control (GNC)

Dr. Mikel M. Miller, USA
Dr. Mikel M. Miller, USA

Dr. Maarten Uijt de Haag, Ohio University, USA
Dr. Maarten Uijt de Haag, Ohio University, USA

Time: Monday, May 1, 1:30 p.m. - 5:00 p.m.
Course Level: Intermediate

This course provides a fundamental background in the guidance, navigation, and control (GNC) aspects of unmanned aircraft systems (UAS) with a focus on Position, Navigation, and Time (PNT). The course describes the importance of PNT to various UAS application domains, operational environments, and regulations. Each of the key elements in UAS GNC is reviewed using multi-copter UAS as an example: Starting with the basic principles of UAS flight dynamics, followed by fundamental GNC using a PixHawk open-source flight controller. Given this foundation, this course will then focus on:

  1. GNSS and inertial sensors for UAS operations; UAS flight management and path planning
  2. Autonomy at the various levels of GNC and flight management
  3. Sense-and-avoid, well-clear and collision avoidance
  4. Geo-fencing and assured containment
  5. Alternative navigation capabilities for UAS operations
  6. Collaborative navigation and swarming of UAS

Dr. Mikel M. Miller has been involved with PNT science and technology (S&T) for over 30 years. His research has centered on Robust SATNAV, Alternatives to GNSS, PNT integration techniques especially focused on Open Architectures, and autonomous systems GNC. He is a Fellow of the ION and the Royal Institute of Navigation. He is a former graduate professor, has authored over 70 navigation-related publications and delivered over 30 keynote talks related to PNT/S&T and its future. He obtained his both his M.S.E.E. and Ph.D. in Electrical Engineering from the Air Force Institute of Technology (AFIT).

Dr. Maarten Uijt de Haag is the Edmund K. Cheng Professor of Electrical Engineering and Computer Science and a Principal Investigator (PI) with the Avionics Engineering Center at Ohio University since 1999. He has authored or co-authored has authored or co-authored over 140 navigation-related publications and seven book chapters. He obtained his M.S.E.E. degree from Delft University in The Netherlands in 1994 and a Ph.D. in Electrical Engineering from Ohio University in Athens, Ohio in 1999.